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Creating a collection with Josh Young

by Framebridge Editorial
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July 09, 2024
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3 min read

“I DM'd Josh in September 2020 as I saw he had just moved to DC. I was a fan of his work and I asked to commission a piece of his art for my living room. Soon, we began talking about a collaboration.”

-Susan Tynan, Framebridge founder

Fast forward four years later, we are proud to debut our first-ever designer collaboration. Read all about how the collection came together in this Q&A with Josh and Susan. Plus, get tips on how to add personality to your home without sacrificing sophistication.

Q. Our collaboration has been years in the making. You felt strongly we had gaps in our collection and you had a vision to fill them. What frame styles are you most excited to see come to life?

A. For me, I wanted to create a collection that felt unique, playful and heavily leaned into being inspired by vintage and antique frames, which I have collected throughout my home and studio. The past has always been an important reference point for me creatively. Savona, Corso Como, and Castello are the three I am most excited about! Corso Como was inspired by vintage letters I found from the 1920s that had this simple black outline and it translated beautifully into this end product.

Q. As a designer and an artist, frames are a consistent part of your everyday work. What does the right frame bring to a room or a piece of art?

A. I think it truly helps substantiate an item or piece of art or a photograph. The marriage between what you are framing and how you are framing it is so important. The right frame not only finishes a piece visually but also showcases its importance. 

Q. We shot these frames in your gorgeous townhome in DC, so you were able to picture where you would hang them (gallery wall under the stairs, space beside your dining room mantel, landing at the top of the stairs, etc.) as you designed them. In what spaces do you see our customers using these frames in their own homes?

A. The thing I love about this collection, and the pieces, is that they are transitional from one space to another, whether it be a bedroom, a hallway or somewhere more unexpected. As you may note in the photos, I like to be playful with where I hang or lean frames—looking to unexpected places, which brings more attention to the piece or frame itself. Whether it’s on the knob of a china cabinet, leaning on a dresser layered with other pieces, or on the face of a bookcase, play around with where you place pieces from the collection.

Q. Our gold bamboo frame, Mandalay, has been a best seller for ten years. What inspired you to design Sempione, a new neutral bamboo?

A. For me, in addition to creating new pieces for the collection, I wanted to take one of your best performers and give my own spin to it. I have always loved Swedish Gustavian style, the qualities of which are usually very raw with simplistic forms and finishes. Stripping down the gilded finish allows it to feel more organic, while still maintaining a very elegant form. 

Q. You had the clearest vision for Corso Como, the white and black frame. We had to work with our team through many rounds to get it to look free-form hand painted (it kept coming out too perfect!) What inspired this style?

A. I collect vintage documents and one I have always loved is a letter from the 1920s that has a simple black outlined border. I wanted to create a piece to mimic this, that at first glance looks hand painted. This leans into the playfulness of the collection and feels a bit more unexpected and unique than typical frames.

Q. You have such a timeless, classic style. What do you do to add a touch of quirk to spaces you are designing? 

A. I think it’s about not being too rigid with what you include. I embrace imperfections and love patina on pieces. It's important not to be too formulated but rather fill your space with pieces you love, while being cognizant of editing and having intentionality with what you include. Just because I love a certain style, or time period, doesn’t mean everything in the room has to be from that inspiration. Finding something unexpected to add into your space can give new life.

Q. If one of our customers, who has traditionally framed art in our cleaner gallery frame styles—like Mercer Slim and Irvine Slim—decided to try something from your new collection, what do you recommend?  

A. I would recommend they look to Via Torino or Milan!

Q. All of the gold and silver frames in your collection are hand leafed in our Italian studio. Your travels and love of antiques really come through in this collection. What would you suggest people frame in these frames?  

A. Anything and everything! Whether it be personal photographs, original art, antique documents, or an item you love—there is no right or wrong idea of a piece to frame if it holds importance to you.

Shop The Story

Brera

Brera

Warm antique gold frame

Castello

Castello

Thin speckled pewter frame

Corso Como

Corso Como

White frame with black edges

La Scala

La Scala

Thin warm gold frame

Milan

Milan

Warm antique silver frame

Savona

Savona

Wide matte white frame

Sempione

Sempione

Putty-colored bamboo frame

The Under the Stairs

The Under the Stairs

A new gallery wall to brighten up the space under the stairwell.

Via Torino

Via Torino

Thin espresso frame